Beyoncé Is Not Jesus

It’s rare in this day and age to meet someone who isn’t obsessed with Beyoncé, or, at the very least, doesn’t appreciate her talent. When you go on your Facebook and Twitter feeds, she’s there in lyrical and GIF forms. When you turn on the radio, one of her songs is playing, and you inevitably begin bobbing your head and rapping or singing along. When she broke the internet (sorry, Kim K. Jk—I’m not) with the release of her new joint “7/11” a few weeks ago, my Twitter timeline was immediately bombarded with hyperbolic tweets. Because of this song, supposedly several proverbial wigs were “snatched” from the heads of non-believers and “peasants,” while members of “The Beyhive” (the name given to the Beyoncé fandom) were seemingly incapable of turning off caps lock as they vividly described the apparent religious experience they were undergoing in real time. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the limit of 140 typographical characters reached in such ways before. Nonetheless, I wasn’t at all taken aback by this kind of reaction; in fact, I was expecting it. I mean, after all, it’s Beyoncé, a woman whose significance has, through the eyes of several people around the world, surpassed that of Jesus. Yeah, THAT Jesus.

I’d like to think of myself as a spiritual person rather than a religious one; the latter implies that I’m devoted to a specific religion and practice it regularly, which isn’t the case. If anything, I’m agnostic. Agnostically spiritual? Spiritually agnostic? Clearly I’m a work in progress, but basically what I’m getting at is that even though I’m not devoted to a religion that believes Jesus to be the son or prophet of God, I find it offensive that some equate a human being—yes, contrary to what some of y’all believe, when Beyoncé gets paper cuts, she bleeds red blood just like us, not gold—to Jesus Christ. I mean, homegirl is even called “Beysus.” Since when was it ever justifiable to make a mockery of religions that are the very core of many people’s lives? Have we become so diluted as a society that we now turn to celebrities for guidance?

Yes, it’s true that Beyoncé has saved the lives of many, both actually and figuratively; trust me, I know very well the healing power of music. And I give her some props for having the innate ability to have such a profound effect on hundreds of thousands of people that she hasn’t even met. But her fascinating influence on others isn’t enough to warrant a comparison to a religious figure whose influence is far greater than hers. Exalting her to a divine level is not only ridiculous, but it’s also demeaning to us everyday folks. If people continue to react as if they’ve just witnessed the resurrection of Jesus when she does, well, anything, it will only give more power to the impression that she transcends humanity. She doesn’t. No one does. She knows this, so why don’t we?

I am not a Beyoncé hater. Actually, I was a huge Destiny’s Child fan growing up and when she went solo, I bought Dangerously In Love as soon as it dropped. I also bought B’Day and when her surprise self-titled album was released last year, I even succumbed to the hype and purchased it and the videos. But my opinion of her has definitely changed over the past 17 years (OMG, has it really been that long?!). No longer is she the woman who can sing and dance her ass off while still maintaining a humble disposition. Now, I don’t think she’s necessarily pompous, but I get the sense that she and her very famous husband are elitist. Is she a great performer? Absolutely. Can she sing? Uh, obviously. Is she pretty? Of course. She also makes catchy-ass music every now and then. But these attributes don’t make her a deity; they just mean that she’s really talented and possesses star power, whatever the hell that is.

Here’s some truth for us all: Beyoncé wasn’t thinking about us yesterday, she wasn’t thinking about us during any part of today, and she sure as hell won’t be thinking about us tomorrow. Not only is she one of the busiest people in the entire world, but she also has a major business to uphold, which means she has no time to even think about her Beyhivers, let alone grieve with them or hold their hand when they’re going through a crisis. So why put so much faith into her? There’s nothing wrong with being a hardcore fan; hell, I’m guilty of obsessing over some famous people. But now that I’m older and am fully aware that they, just like me, are human and are not infallible, I’ve chilled out with treating them like they’re saints. They make a lot of money and sure, some days I imagine myself being in their shoes. But all that glitters isn’t gold, kids.

Let’s do better. Let’s stop saying Beyoncé is Jesus, because she isn’t, and she will never be.

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